Underrated Technology and Innovations

The end of 2012 is looming and 2013 is sure to bring plenty of surprises. In the new year we can expect there to be plenty of hype around new innovations and pieces of technology. So, I want to take this time to reflect on a few bits of technology that perhaps do not get the credit.

When it comes to technology, we probably think about laptops, tablets, smartphones and other flashy equipment, taking for granted the obvious things that we do not consider luxuries. The truth is we generally direct most our credit towards whatever we find aesthetically pleasing. For example whilst your sexy new Samsung Galaxy 3 absorbs all its plaudits your humble mouse is sat by the computer being used and abused for hours on end without so much as a thank you!

Below are a few random innovations and bits of technology that i feel do not get the credit they deserve.

What about the wireless revolution? Wireless Internet, NFC and Bluetooth? All these things are key features in the world of modern mobile technology and don’t nearly get enough credit.

Amazon’s warehousing and shipping practises have absolutely revolutionised the way we shop online. The ability to order something you need and have it at your home the very next day is a service that Amazon have aced and such a convenience should not be taken for granted.

The power of the blog. Without our blog we wouldn’t have the means of sharing information with rest of the world the way we do today. Blogging is a great way to keep people informed and up to date with new products and the latest news. It drives people to our website and opens up topics for discussion. Blogging has led to vlogging (video blogging) and these innovative methods of communication has grown in popularity in the past 10 years and simply doesn’t get the recognition.

So be it new or old technology is there anything you feel is underrated and deserves a moment in the limelight?

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Comments

  1. I’d put my hand up for bluetooth; one of those technologies that never seems that popular, and a pain to use sometimes, but I use it for hours a day so I can listen to audiobooks and music without messing around with unspooling and winding up cables. I start walking, pop an earpiece in, and it’s done. Also good for desktop decabling, though proprietary communication systems like Logitech’s 2.4GHz (?) dongles seem as popular for that.

  2. Bugblatter says:

    I was reading about Amazon’s warehousing the other day. Given how they treat their warehouse employees it’s probably not something to be lauded.

    Vlogging and web-casting feels like a backwards step; it takes me 10-30 minutes to get the particular information in which I’m interested which I could have skim-read in 30 seconds. I rarely bother with them.

    I’d vote for the likes of Napster, Spotify, Rdio etc. Discovery needs to be improved, but having instant flat-fee access to all that music on so many devices is pretty amazing.

  3. Chris Ward says:

    I’d agree with both here that while Amazon has pushed some incredible technology over the last 20 years, but its ethics are somewhat questionable to say the least.

    The Kindle has made a massive difference for me. For articles its great – I send them to my Kindle from Chrome during the day and it then means I don’t need to read from a backlit screen when I come to read them later in the evening. When it comes to novels, though, I do still find myself having the book vs Kindle argument.

    Peer to peer is something that is easy to take for granted as well, perhaps because the legitimate opportunities that it offers are not recognised (not utilised) as they should be.